Innovations for equity

Posts Tagged ‘Uganda’

Sexy, maybe. Fun, definitely!

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 18, 2010 at 8:49 am

BY ELIZABETH EKIRAPA-KIRACHO, MAKERERE UNIVERSITY PUBLIC HEALTH

In response to Nandini’s question can research make health systems sexier?  I guess it can it all depends on the researchers line of thought. I have been part of the Future Health Systems Consortium for five years and believe me I have realised that health systems research can be lots of fun! You must be wondering why. This particular consortium allows you to be creative and innovative. Nobody tells you what to research on, you decide what is relevant for you and you think of innovative ways to solve the problems that plague health systems in developing countries. This is a big lesson for developing countries we need to start thinking and doing what we think is best for us in our context. During this Global symposium, the issue of context is coming out strongly context matters in health systems research. We know our context best we should get into the driver’s seat.

Two quotations will stay with me after all is said and done at this conference. The one by Davis Miles “don’t play what’s there play what’s not there.” I look forward to researching on health systems topics that are still a puzzle. As part of the safe deliveries study, we are piloting a study that gives mothers access to delivery and postnatal care services in Eastern Uganda using vouchers.  Institutional deliveries have increased tremendously! Great but the question remains how can you scale up this initiative in a resource constrained country?

The second quotation is by Abbas Bhuia “Leave a mark in the field where you are researching.” I guess not only a mark of excellent research but a mark that you have made a difference in the lives of the people in that community.

A post on posters

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 10:05 pm

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Time after time at international conferences I am amazed that people don’t pay more attention to poster presentations. Often they provide a clear and coherent argument and compelling graphics and images which are far more effective than many oral sessions. You can keep a copy and refer back to them. What’s more – when your energy is lagging due to conference overload you can count on them to be concise and to the point!

So I’m going to draw your attention to 2 poster presentations that are being given here at the Global Symposium by Future Health Systems Consortium researchers. The first is on “Experiences of Implementing a Demand Side Financing Scheme for Maternal Health Services in Eastern Uganda.” It explains how the team are studying demand (vouchers for transport and maternal services) and supply side initiatives (training health workers and provision of essential equipment, drugs and supplies) to explore how we can improve the uptake of maternal health services. The second is “Exploring health researchers’ perceptions of policymaking in Argentina: A qualitative study.” This research took the form of semi-structured, indepth interviews with 20 key informants, representing sites in the Federal City of Buenos Aires and the provinces of Salta, Jujuy, Tucuman, Santiagodel Estero and Catamarca, in Argentina’s north west region.

I’m not going to tell you what they concluded. You’ll have to download the posters to find out… 

 

Less lecturing, more listening!

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 6:55 am
The First Health Systems Research Conference – my expectations: Less lecturing, more listening, but is it happening? So far there have been limited voices from low income countries. Shall we be heard or it is another opportunity to listen, and be told of dos and don’ts? In Uganda, the operational units are health units, hospitals, health sub districts and districts. Have I heard anybody speak of how to make them more functional within a limited resource base? No, but I am waiting!!! Of course there is talk of funding for health systems, and this should be a focus of donors. I say, no, this should be what we demand from our governments. There is talk of technology, etc. Well, small simple things first for me: sanitation, housing, education, food, immunisation, and simple preventive knowledge. Okay, I am still here till end of week, to learn about health systems research. I will wait and see if, as I leave, I will know how to deliver services to the poorest in the remotest parts of my home district, or indeed how to measure health systems. Time will tell. But give people a voice, the people who live in the systems that we are trying to study.

Understanding and Intervening in Informal Markets in Health

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Health Markets, Uncategorized on November 16, 2010 at 10:28 pm

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

David Peters chairing the sessionOver the last few years we’ve done a lot of research to explore interventions that might make health markets work better for poor people. This work is premised on the understanding that markets for health-related goods and services are widespread and in many developing countries poor people seek some proportion of their health care in these markets.

Today’s session at the Global Symposium was structured around a series of 5 minute “lightening” presentations which gave an overview of the evidence and provided feedback on research from Bangladesh, Nigeria, Uganda and India.

You can view the slides from all of the speakers below.