Innovations for equity

Posts Tagged ‘policy’

Learning by doing and applying our learning: What are the strategies and institutional options?

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 23, 2010 at 2:39 pm

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUIDES
BASED ON NOTES BY LIGIA PAINA, JOHNS HOPKINS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Learning by doing sounds a nebulous concept but actually it is crucial in health systems development. If we can’t understand the process of intervening in the system and the positive and negative outcomes of our actions how can we improve the work that we are doing? The last decade has seen a rapid increase in the number of institutions such as learning platforms, health observatories, and think tanks. But at the same time, there is a lack of clarity in the difference between them, as well as their pros and cons.

This Future Health Systems Consortium session at the Global Symposium included presentations from the Asian Observatory on Health Systems, The Zambian Forum for Health Research, Health Intervention and Technical Assessment Program (HITAP) Thailand and The China National Health Development Research Center. It tried to better understand the work that they are doing as well as the challenges that they face. Read the rest of this entry »

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A post on posters

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 10:05 pm

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Time after time at international conferences I am amazed that people don’t pay more attention to poster presentations. Often they provide a clear and coherent argument and compelling graphics and images which are far more effective than many oral sessions. You can keep a copy and refer back to them. What’s more – when your energy is lagging due to conference overload you can count on them to be concise and to the point!

So I’m going to draw your attention to 2 poster presentations that are being given here at the Global Symposium by Future Health Systems Consortium researchers. The first is on “Experiences of Implementing a Demand Side Financing Scheme for Maternal Health Services in Eastern Uganda.” It explains how the team are studying demand (vouchers for transport and maternal services) and supply side initiatives (training health workers and provision of essential equipment, drugs and supplies) to explore how we can improve the uptake of maternal health services. The second is “Exploring health researchers’ perceptions of policymaking in Argentina: A qualitative study.” This research took the form of semi-structured, indepth interviews with 20 key informants, representing sites in the Federal City of Buenos Aires and the provinces of Salta, Jujuy, Tucuman, Santiagodel Estero and Catamarca, in Argentina’s north west region.

I’m not going to tell you what they concluded. You’ll have to download the posters to find out… 

 

Building Health Policy and Systems Research Capacity

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 11:34 am

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

On Monday conference participants at the Global Symposium gathered to explore how we can work together to understand and increase capacity for undertaking and utilising Health Policy and Systems Research. This is a priority area if we are serious about improving systems and service delivery for the people who need it the most.

You can download the main messages from the satellite below but in short we need to:

  • Forcefully make the argument that health policy and systems research is important
  • Work in multi-stakeholder partnerships to support country-driven research agendas, evaluate the evidence and get this work into policy and practice
  • Push governments and other funders to invest in this area, particularly in national research organisations over the longer term
  • Make sure that health policy and systems research is harmonized and aligned with the national agenda
  • Encourage further exploration of methodologies for this work
  • Support and nurture young researchers
  • Develop cross-country lesson learning and collaboration

>>Health Policy and Systems Research main messages