Innovations for equity

Posts Tagged ‘financing’

New Consortium launched at the Symposium: REBUILD

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 22, 2010 at 4:24 pm

BY TIM  MARTINEAU, GUEST BLOGGER FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE

Tim explaining the soft launchIn countries affected by political and social conflict, health systems often break down and emergency assistance provided by humanitarian organisations often constitutes the main source of care. As recovery begins, so should the process of rebuilding health systems but little is known about how effective different approaches are in practice. Health systems research has tended to neglect these contexts, because it may be more difficult to carry out studies in unstable environments and relevant capacity is often weak. Read the rest of this entry »

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From Montreux – the First Global Symposium on Health Systems Research

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 21, 2010 at 2:21 pm

BY MICHAEL LOEVINSOHN, GUEST BLOGGER FROM THE STEPS CENTRE

You know you’re a discipline or a significant sub-discipline when you can organize and find funding for a global symposium. Twelve hundred participants from umpteen countries also testify to the self-awareness that marks a field. And the Symposium’s theme is fittingly ambitious: Science to Accelerate Universal Health Coverage.

Charlie Chaplin is in town but can’t make it to the Symposium. He’s buried just down the road. But I wonder what his Little Tramp, bowler-hatted and down-at-heels, would make of it. Would he be considered part of the System? Am I? My interest is in the determinants of disease in the turbulent social, economic and natural environment and what that understanding can contribute especially to prevention. Read the rest of this entry »

Beyond Resource Mobilisation

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 16, 2010 at 11:10 pm

BY DAVID BISHAI, JOHNS HOPKINS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Transmitting the needs of the poor to the ears of the policymaker is not as easy as it seems.  The poor themselves do not fully know what causes their ill health.  They and their doctors frame the problem in medical terms.  Epidemiologists multiply case counts into “burden”.  Economists prioritize disease burdens according to the costs of the medical solution.  Advocates use photo journals, tales of woe, body counts and whatever cost-effectiveness estimates they can get their hands on to elbow their way into the hearts and minds of the global policymakers, government officials, and donors. Read the rest of this entry »