Innovations for equity

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Funding from the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research awarded to the Uganda team

In Uncategorized on December 6, 2010 at 2:59 pm

We are delighted to announce that our Uganda Team has received a grant from The Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research from their new Implementation Research Platform.

The Platform has been set up to identify common implementation problems, develop and test practical solutions to these problems and determine the best way of introducing these solutions into the health system and implement at scale.

The study will build on Future Health System’s research into the use of motor bike transport to improve the uptake of maternal health care. It will look at how two types of interventions, one aimed at increasing access to institutional deliveries and care for complications through vouchers, and the other aimed at improving newborn care and uptake of PMTCT through home visits by community health workers, can be integrated and scaled-up within the existing health system in Uganda. It will also explore the effect of implementing the integrated intervention on the proportion of deliveries that occurs in health facilities, and on neonatal mortality.

You can read more about the work in Uganda on our website.

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See Sara on film talking in the plenary at the Global Symposium

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 25, 2010 at 4:22 pm

It is now possible to see Sara Bennett’s plenary presentation on the web. You can also download her PowerPoint presentation from the Global Symposium site.

Learning by doing and applying our learning: What are the strategies and institutional options?

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 23, 2010 at 2:39 pm

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUIDES
BASED ON NOTES BY LIGIA PAINA, JOHNS HOPKINS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Learning by doing sounds a nebulous concept but actually it is crucial in health systems development. If we can’t understand the process of intervening in the system and the positive and negative outcomes of our actions how can we improve the work that we are doing? The last decade has seen a rapid increase in the number of institutions such as learning platforms, health observatories, and think tanks. But at the same time, there is a lack of clarity in the difference between them, as well as their pros and cons.

This Future Health Systems Consortium session at the Global Symposium included presentations from the Asian Observatory on Health Systems, The Zambian Forum for Health Research, Health Intervention and Technical Assessment Program (HITAP) Thailand and The China National Health Development Research Center. It tried to better understand the work that they are doing as well as the challenges that they face. Read the rest of this entry »

New Consortium launched at the Symposium: REBUILD

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 22, 2010 at 4:24 pm

BY TIM  MARTINEAU, GUEST BLOGGER FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE

Tim explaining the soft launchIn countries affected by political and social conflict, health systems often break down and emergency assistance provided by humanitarian organisations often constitutes the main source of care. As recovery begins, so should the process of rebuilding health systems but little is known about how effective different approaches are in practice. Health systems research has tended to neglect these contexts, because it may be more difficult to carry out studies in unstable environments and relevant capacity is often weak. Read the rest of this entry »

Networking at the Global Symposium

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 21, 2010 at 3:55 pm

Whilst we were very busy at the conference the Future Health Systems Consortium also found some time to catch up with old friends and to meet new ones.

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From Montreux – the First Global Symposium on Health Systems Research

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 21, 2010 at 2:21 pm

BY MICHAEL LOEVINSOHN, GUEST BLOGGER FROM THE STEPS CENTRE

You know you’re a discipline or a significant sub-discipline when you can organize and find funding for a global symposium. Twelve hundred participants from umpteen countries also testify to the self-awareness that marks a field. And the Symposium’s theme is fittingly ambitious: Science to Accelerate Universal Health Coverage.

Charlie Chaplin is in town but can’t make it to the Symposium. He’s buried just down the road. But I wonder what his Little Tramp, bowler-hatted and down-at-heels, would make of it. Would he be considered part of the System? Am I? My interest is in the determinants of disease in the turbulent social, economic and natural environment and what that understanding can contribute especially to prevention. Read the rest of this entry »

Sexy, maybe. Fun, definitely!

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 18, 2010 at 8:49 am

BY ELIZABETH EKIRAPA-KIRACHO, MAKERERE UNIVERSITY PUBLIC HEALTH

In response to Nandini’s question can research make health systems sexier?  I guess it can it all depends on the researchers line of thought. I have been part of the Future Health Systems Consortium for five years and believe me I have realised that health systems research can be lots of fun! You must be wondering why. This particular consortium allows you to be creative and innovative. Nobody tells you what to research on, you decide what is relevant for you and you think of innovative ways to solve the problems that plague health systems in developing countries. This is a big lesson for developing countries we need to start thinking and doing what we think is best for us in our context. During this Global symposium, the issue of context is coming out strongly context matters in health systems research. We know our context best we should get into the driver’s seat.

Two quotations will stay with me after all is said and done at this conference. The one by Davis Miles “don’t play what’s there play what’s not there.” I look forward to researching on health systems topics that are still a puzzle. As part of the safe deliveries study, we are piloting a study that gives mothers access to delivery and postnatal care services in Eastern Uganda using vouchers.  Institutional deliveries have increased tremendously! Great but the question remains how can you scale up this initiative in a resource constrained country?

The second quotation is by Abbas Bhuia “Leave a mark in the field where you are researching.” I guess not only a mark of excellent research but a mark that you have made a difference in the lives of the people in that community.

A post on posters

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 10:05 pm

BY KATE HAWKINS, INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Time after time at international conferences I am amazed that people don’t pay more attention to poster presentations. Often they provide a clear and coherent argument and compelling graphics and images which are far more effective than many oral sessions. You can keep a copy and refer back to them. What’s more – when your energy is lagging due to conference overload you can count on them to be concise and to the point!

So I’m going to draw your attention to 2 poster presentations that are being given here at the Global Symposium by Future Health Systems Consortium researchers. The first is on “Experiences of Implementing a Demand Side Financing Scheme for Maternal Health Services in Eastern Uganda.” It explains how the team are studying demand (vouchers for transport and maternal services) and supply side initiatives (training health workers and provision of essential equipment, drugs and supplies) to explore how we can improve the uptake of maternal health services. The second is “Exploring health researchers’ perceptions of policymaking in Argentina: A qualitative study.” This research took the form of semi-structured, indepth interviews with 20 key informants, representing sites in the Federal City of Buenos Aires and the provinces of Salta, Jujuy, Tucuman, Santiagodel Estero and Catamarca, in Argentina’s north west region.

I’m not going to tell you what they concluded. You’ll have to download the posters to find out… 

 

Would you like an injection with that Happy Meal?

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 9:23 pm

BY DANIELA LEWY, JOHNS HOPKINS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

I started my career in education, transitioned to corporate training, and then navigated into public health. But with each professional shift – not much seems particularly different. Universal Education and Universal Healthcare; supply/demand principles at Johns Hopkins Hospital and supply/demand principles at Mars Corporation; and increased salaries for teachers, nurses, or accountants doesn’t always translate to better test scores, fewer infections, or less bankruptcy. 

So when yesterday’s session on social franchising began with a reference to McDonalds – I sat up straight. I like the intersection of seemingly disparate fields.  Read the rest of this entry »

Future Health Systems’ Researchers Enjoying the Symposium

In Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Uncategorized on November 17, 2010 at 2:59 pm

Sabina Faiz RashidOladimeji Oladepo and Hafiz RahmanAbbas Bhuiya